Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?

15th July 2024 15/07/2024 14:20-16:30

On Monday 15th July, the Education Policy Institute (EPI) will hold a conference exploring: Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?  in partnership with The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award (DofE) and National Citizen Service NCS).

We know that enrichment, through sports, arts, music or hobbies clubs, is beneficial for children and young people, improving their confidence, social skills, self-esteem, and provides them with new skills and abilities. In fact, often one of the distinguishing features of a private education is the wide variety of enrichment opportunities that independent schools are able to provide. In contrast, state schools and colleges are facing increasingly straightened budgets, leading to cuts in the wider offer outside the classroom. 

Though the benefits are well-known, at the very least anecdotally, the evidence body for the impacts of enrichment on outcomes, particularly longer-term ones, is relatively small. This evidence gap means that making the case for policies supporting enrichment activities, such as a set of benchmarks; weighted ring-fenced funding and an extended school day, in state schools and colleges is a challenge, one of particular weight as we head into a new parliament following the general election. 

In Spring 2024, EPI published various reports aiming to address this evidence gap, looking at the association of extracurricular activities with longer-term outcomes and the potential benefits of extending the school day using cross-country comparisons. SQW also published work commissioned by DCMS which asked: what effect does regular attendance at youth clubs have on young people into adulthood? 

This timely conference will bring together politicians, Department for Education and Department for Culture, Media and Sport representatives, school and youth work leaders, to discuss the implications of the evidence for policy; the current disparities in attendance, particularly for the most disadvantaged students; and how to ensure those most in need enrichment have equal access. Following presentations of research from EPI, SQW, NCS and DofE, we will welcome an expert panel including Oli de Botton, The Careers & Enterprise Company; Ruth Marvel, DofE; Anne Longfield, Centre for Young Lives and Hannah Stoddart, NCS. The event will be chaired by EPI’s CEO, Natalie Perera.

 

**This event is ticketed – please contact reception@epi.org.uk to secure a place**

 

SPEAKERS
Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?
Oli de Botton
CEO, The Careers & Enterprise Company
Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?
Anne Longfield
Executive Chair and Founder, Centre For Young Lives
Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?
Will Millard
Associate Director, SQW
Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?
Natalie Perera
Chief Executive, Education Policy Institute
Enrichment for all: what does the evidence tell us about access, impact and opportunities for improvement?
David Robinson
Director for Post 16 and Skills, Education Policy Institute